If you’re an automotive supplier or service provider, TISAX compliance has become a prerequisite for doing business with any major German automobile company. However, like many other data security mandates, TISAX is only a few years old, and many organizations are still searching for the right approach to it.

In our TISAX blog series, we’ll explore the specific requirements that auto industry suppliers and service providers must meet, and how PKWARE is helping organizations meet those requirements. But first, we’ll take on a more general question:

What is TISAX and why does it matter?

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Having recently joined the PCI Security Standards Council, PKWARE was proud to participate as a Technology Sponsor at the Council’s 2019 North America Community Meeting in Vancouver. The event was well attended, with more than 1,000 individuals from all over the North America coming together to discuss the future of payment card data and security.

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Data loss prevention (DLP) and encryption are two of the most important data security technologies in use today, but they don't always play well together. Encryption often prevents DLP from inspecting data as it leaves the organization, while DLP often lacks the ability to encrypt unprotected data according to organizational policy. That's why global banks, retailers, and other organizations rely on PKWARE DLP Enhancement.

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Throughout 2019, PKWARE has sponsored and moderated boardroom discussions at Evanta CISO Executive Summits in North America and Europe. These engaging, productive conversations have focused on key data security issues including compliance, data governance, data ownership, data retention, risk management, discovery classification, and information lifecycle management.

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Updated September 2019

Data breaches are simply a fact of life. Businesses in every industry, in every country, are attacked by data thieves and malicious insiders on a daily basis. As pervasive as they are today, cyber threats will only grow more severe as time goes on—each newly-developed way to communicate or do business online creates new forms of sensitive data that hackers, industrial spies, and state-sponsored operatives are ready to exploit.

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Guest blogger: Derek Brink, Aberdeen Group

In the realm of information security, the traditional trade-offs security professionals seek to balance, such as effectiveness of security, total cost of ownership, and convenience for users have been the relentless targets for continuous improvement by innovative solution providers. Anyone who has been working in this field for a length of time would have to admit that today’s security solutions are more capable, cost-effective, and much easier to use than the security solutions of 20, 10, or even five years ago.

But there were over 3,200 publicly disclosed data breaches from 2017-2018, which averages to between four and five data breaches daily. Although the median number of records disclosed to unauthorized parties was relatively small (about 1,300 records per breach), there were 114 data breaches of 1M records or greater during this two-year period – or, about one mega-breach weekly.

How can these two observations be reconciled?

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Guest blogger: Derek Brink, Aberdeen Group

Data loss prevention (DLP) solutions are designed...well, to prevent the loss of enterprise data. Said a bit more formally: by “loss,” we mean the confirmed disclosure of an organization’s data assets to an unauthorized party—i.e., a data breach. Said still another way, DLP solutions are designed to reduce the risk of a data breach.

This begs an obvious question, which unfortunately doesn’t often get a crisp response: just what is the risk of a data breach? To answer this question in a way that’s useful to an organization’s senior leadership team, security professionals and solution providers have to consider both the likelihood that a data breach may happen in a specified period of time, as well as the resulting business impact if it actually does occur. That’s just the proper definition of risk.

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Guest blogger: Derek Brink, Aberdeen Group

It’s hard to believe, but security professionals and solution providers have been talking about the need to protect cardholder data (i.e., payment card account numbers, cardholder names, expiration dates, and security-related information used to authenticate cardholders or authorize transactions)—wherever that data is stored, processed, and transmitted—since the 1990s.

Starting with the independently developed data protection initiatives of the major card brands (i.e., Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Discover, JCB), the industry standards and best practices for this nearly universal issue have continued to mature and evolve. From the version 1.0 release of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) in December 2004, to the now-current version 3.2.1 release in May 2018, one would think that everyone would have this problem fully solved by now, right?

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